Oncidium Orchids

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Known as the,”The Dancing Lady” this is a beautiful orchid that is jam-packed with flowers (as shown above). Their flowers tend to “fall” or cascade down and are much smaller than most orchids. Each flower resembles a tiny lady dancing, which makes them quite fun! Normally their colors range from a yellow, tricolor, or the popular “Red Sharry baby” (which, I have been told, smells like chocolate) shown below…

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These orchids are easy to grown indoors but need MORE light (they need to be in a bright window in your home) then the popular, Phalaenopsis.

Don’t be alarmed if it seems like your Oncidiums are growing up an out of their pots (as shown below). This is normal for this type of orchid because in nature they would be trying to grow up a tree trunk. And don’t be quick to cut off their shoots because many times they will re-bloom off the same shoot! I was told to cut them back only if they turn brown or are rotting.

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As far as repotting, Oncidiums like to be slightly under potted in a very free-draining bark-based potting media. Oncidiums tend to form large clumps of pseudobulbs and develop into rather large plants, which means they can easily be divided when repotting. I have been told to make sure there are at least three pseudobulbs in each division.

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Here are two pics of my Oncidium Intergeneric named Wilsonara Kolibri… deep purple!!

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Oncidiums Cycle and Needs;

  • Water: You need to water thoroughly then allow to dry out very briefly between waterings.
  • Light: They need bright light.Temperature: Min temp of 55 degrees, max of 95
  • Fertilize: I use FEED ME!.
  • Growth Habit: Grows new pseudobulbs every year. Bloom spikes emerge from new pseudobulbs at the base of the new pseudobulb, usually in fall or winter.
  • Look for: New pseudobulbs in the Spring and Summer, spikes in the Fall, blooms in the Fall or Winter
  • Repot every 1-2 years
  • Potting Mixes: I use Oncidium Imperial Orchid Mix

Introducing my newest orchid – A Miniature Oncidium Twinkle. Of course I named it Twinkle:)

Miniature Oncidiums, the most popular being Oncidium Twinkle, have a remarkable number of flowers for such a small plant. Miniature Oncidiums prefer to be in a small, tight pot and will dry out very quickly. It is a bit of a challenge keeping these little guys moist enough. Still, they are relatively easy to grow and have a generous bloom. Unlike standard Oncidiums, the miniature varieties are less likely to attempt to grow up and out of the pot.

These are diminutive plants, usually 6 inches or less in height.

Hope that Helps,

Hannah

Feel free to leave comments or questions here and you can always email me at myfirstorchid@gmail.com with pictures of your orchid.

 

7 Comments on “Oncidium Orchids

  1. Hi Hannah, I think I might be turning into mad orchid woman, although I only have six orchids at the moment! Yesterday I took pity on one in my supermarket as it looked a bit neglected and in need of rescue.

    It’s different to my other orchids which are phals, and the label said that it was a Cambria orchid, which when I googled, discovered that these are hybrids
    https://www.orchidsinfo.eu/#!/en/the-orchid/cambrialike-orchid/
    It looks very like the photos that you have on Oncidiums here, It is not in a clear pot and has no aerial roots. Because of this I have no idea whether it needs watering, so I haven’t yet. The bark medium looks slightly green which makes me wonder if it’s been over-watered recently. The leaves all look healthy and it has a spike of rather tatty flowers, but also a new spike, which was bent as it hadn’t been staked.

    As the leaves all look healthy I’m thinking that I will leave another couple of weeks before watering then it will be in the same routine as my others.

    As you don’t have a section on these Cambria hybrids, should I follow the care plan that you have here for Oncidiums? Also, should I repot into a clear pot or does that not help with this type? I rely on the clear pots for when to water!

    Thanks for any advice
    Jennie

  2. Dear Hannah,
    I bought a sapling of Onicidium from Singapore Orchid garden which was available in a tissue culture medium. I have recently planted it in a charcoal mix and water it alternate days. Please guide me how to take care of such a tiny plant and ensure its survival. Can I add fertilizer to such a baby plant. How long it will take to grow into an adult plant and bloom ? Thanks a lot, lucky to come across your well explained website!

  3. I have repotted the oncidium as I said in bark and terracotta balls but did not leave it in water for more than 10 minutes. Also I divided it so now I have 2 Oncidiums. One part had hardly any roots in the growing medium so I put the roots that were outside into the growing medium. I fertilized the one with very few roots to see if that helps. It is the larger part and I used a bigger pot for it. I put the smaller one back into the pot it came in. They are in the window facing south to get as much light as possible early in the morning. When the sun is bright I shall move them away from the window and shade them. I hope at least one of them will grow well now and bloom sometime.

  4. I was given an Oncidium on Monday morning by a friend who gave up waiting for it to bloom. It looks dehydrated though he watered it before he gave it to me. I think it needs repotting. I thought I would pot it in a mixture of bark and terracotta balls. Then I am going to let it stand in a bowl of water (which will not reach the crown as I do not want it to get root rot) and leave it to soak up as much water as it wants for an hoúr and then leave it in the sink till all the excess water has drained off.

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